Final Result of the EATS Research ProjectAbout Us

Final Result of the EATS Research Project, 2014-2016

Benjamin Hlavaty

EATS Board initiated a research project in 2014-2016 to investigate the situation of formal publications as a result of EATS Annual Conferences between 2004 and 2016. With the approval of the General Meeting in 2014, Benjamin Hlavaty was appointed as a part-time Research Assistant to work on the project. Benjamin wrote a first report in february 2015 and a second report in february 2016. In total 310 presenters and 18 keynote speakers were contacted. Their professional data, contact information and details of their presentations were entered into EATS database. Based on their replies by the end of the research project in june 2016, 126 publication entries were recorded, which represents at least a 36 percent of publication rate as some presenters could not be contacted while others did not respond. It can be argued that the bibliography below has demonstrated the positive impact of EATS Annual Conferences. We have highlighted special issues of journals and edited volumes for easy identification.

Publications as a Result of EATS Annual Conferences and/or with EATS Input
(by the alphabetical order of surnames)

  1. Adelaar, Alexander (2007). Siraya, Taiwan‘s oldest written language. In: C. Storm and M. Harrison (eds.) The Margins of Becoming. Identity and Culture in Taiwan. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 19–34.
  2. Ash, Robert et al (2006). The economic legacy of the KMT and its implications for economic policy formulation by the DPP. In: In: Dafydd Fell, Bi-yuChang and Henning Klöter(eds.) What has Changed? Taiwan Before and After the Change in Ruling Parties. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 83–106.
  3. Britwistle, Andy (2012). White noise: The representation of modernity in the films of Bai Jing-rui. In: Bi-yu Chang and Henning Klöter (eds.) Imaging and Imagining Taiwan: Identity representation and cultural politics. Wiesbaden:Harrassowitz, 51–68.
  4. Calvo, Alex (2014). Anti-ship missiles in the defence of Taiwan: Limited war or people‘s war? China Policy Institute Blog, University of Nottingham, 19 August.
  5. Calvo, Alex (2014). Transition to professional military hits snags. Strategic Vision. Volume 3 Issue 13.
  6. Chang, Bi-yu (2012). Imaging national landscape: Yushan, modern myth and identity. In: Bi-yu Chang and Henning Klöter (eds.) Imaging and Imagining Taiwan: Identity representation and cultural politics. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 149–169.
  7. Chang, Bi-yu (2007). Disclaiming and renegotiating national memory: Taiwanese xiqu and identity. In: C. Storm and M. Harrison (eds.) The Margins of Becoming. Identity and Culture in Taiwan. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 51–68.
  8. Chang, Bi-yu (2006). Constructing the motherland: Culture and the state in Taiwan. In:Dafydd Fell, Bi-yu Chang and Henning Klöter (eds.) What has Changed? Taiwan Before and After the Change in Ruling Parties. Wiesbaden Harrassowitz, 187–206.
  9. Chang, Bi-yu (2004). From Taiwanisation to de-Sinification: Culture construction in Taiwan since the 1990s. China Perspectives 56(November–December): 34–44.
  10. Chang, Yvonne Sung-sheng (2016). Building a modern institution of literature: The case of Taiwan. In:Yingjin Zhang (ed.) A Companion to Modern Chinese Literature. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, 116–133.
  11. Chang, Yvonne Sung-sheng (2014). Literary Taiwan in East Asian context. In: S.S.Y. Chang, Michelle Yeh and, Ming-ju Fan (eds.) Introduction to The Columbia Sourcebook of Literary Taiwan. New York: Columbia University Press, 1–36.
  12. Chen, Elsa Hsiang-chun (2007). Reading Taiwan and the issue of difference in a global/local frame: Epitaph by Wu Mali in "Sadness Transformed: 2/28 Commemorative Art Exhibition in Taiwan" in 1997. In: C. Storm and M. Harrison (eds.) The Margins of Becoming. Identity and Culture in Taiwan. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 185–198.
  13. Chen, Yu-Wen; Lay, Jinn-Guey; Yap, Ko-Hua (2010). Geographic reality versus imagination in Taiwan‘s historical maps. The Cartographic Journal 47(2): 180–189.
  14. Cheng, Isabelle (2016). Which team do you support? Situating the in-between identity of immigrant women in Taiwan. Chinese History and Society/Berliner China-Hefte47.
  15. Cheng, Isabelle (2013). Home-going or home-making? The citizenship legislation and Chinese identity of Indonesian Chinese women in Taiwan. In:Kuei-fen Chiu, Ping Lin andDafydd Fell (eds.) Migration to and from Taiwan. London: Routledge, 135–158.
  16. Cheng, Isabelle (2013). Making foreign women the mother of our nation: The exclusion and assimilation of immigrant women in Taiwan. Asian Ethnicity 14(2): 157–179.
  17. Cheng, Isabelle and Fell, Dafydd (2014). The change of ruling parties and Taiwan's claim to multiculturalism before and after 2008. The Journal of Current Chinese Affairs 43(3): 71–103.
  18. Chiang, Min-chin (2010). The hallway of memory—A case study on the diversified interpretation of cultural heritage in Taiwan. In: Ann Heylen and Scott Sommers (eds.) Becoming Taiwan: From Colonialism to Democracy. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 117–134.
  19. Chiu, Ann (2012). Fuzhou Chinese speech group and associations: Online debates over the landmarks of Manhattan Chinatown after 9/11. Journal of Chinese Overseas 8: 232–264.
  20. Chu, Feng-yi(2016). Benevolent self vs. malignant other: The east-west antagonistic narrative of Taiwanese people‘s Chinese identity. Chinese History and Society/Berliner China-Hefte47.
  21. Corcuff, Stéphane (2008). Taiwan's mainlanders under Chen Shui-bian: A shift from the political to the cultural?In: G. Schubert and J. Damm (eds.) Taiwanese Identity in the 21st Century: Domestic, Regional and Global Perspectives. London, Routledge, 113–129.
  22. Corcuff, Stéphane (2007). The supporters of unification and the Taiwanizationmovement: Psychology and politics in the blue camp's 2004 presidential election campaign. In: C. Storm and M. Harrison (eds.) The Margins of Becoming. Identity and Culture in Taiwan. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 199–220.
  23. Damm, Jens (2016). The contemporary political and public discourse on the Xinhai Revolution in Taiwan. Chinese History and Society/Berliner China-Hefte47.
  24. Damm, Jens and Cheng, Isabelle (eds.) (2016). Special issue of Chinese History and Society/Berliner China-Hefte47 on "Taiwan: Self vs. Other". This issue of Chinese History and Society/Berliner China-Hefte themed 'Taiwan: Self vs. Other' brings together outstanding contributions from the 11th annual EATS conference which was held at the University of Portsmouth, UK, in 2014.
  25. Dluhošová, Táňa (2011). Taiwan funü in the early post -war period (1945–1949) literary field. Archívorientální/Oriental Archive 79(3): 357–377.
  26. Dluhošová, Táňa (2010). Early postwar debates on Taiwan and Taiwanese literature. In:Heylen Ann and Sommers Scott (eds.) Becoming Taiwan: From Colonialism to Democracy. Wiesbaden: Harassowitz, 181– 197.
  27. Dluhošová, Táňa and Heylen, Ann (eds.)(December 2013). Oriental Archive, vol.81, issue 3. EATS has been in cooperation with ArchívOrientální/Oriental Archive, a quarterly peer-reviewed academic journal published by the Czech Academy of Sciences. Oriental Archive is continuously in print since 1929 and provides an important forum for scholars from the EU and other European countries. The 2013 special issue on Taiwan is about "Popular Culture and Literature in Taiwan" and represents a collective effort of many EATS members and EATS conference participants.
  28. Esteban, Mario (2013). ¿China o Taiwán?: Las paradojas de Costa Rica y Nicaragua (2006–2008). Revista de CienciaPolítica 33: 513–532.
  29. Esteban, Mario (2007). Democratization of the people's Republic of China and military conflict in the Taiwan Strait. The Journal of Current Chinese Affairs 36: 5–31.
  30. Esteban, Mario (2007). The diplomatic battle between Beijing and Taipei in Latin America and the Caribbean. Chinese (Taiwan) Yearbook of International Law and Affairs 25: 65–88.
  31. Fan, Ming-ju (2007). The sense of place in Hwang Chun-ming‘sfiction. In: C. Storm and M. Harrison (eds.) The Margins of Becoming. Identity and Culture in Taiwan. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 117–124.
  32. Fell, Dafydd (2014). Should I stay or should I go? Patterns of party switching in multiparty Taiwan. Journal of East Asian Studies 14(1): 31–52.
  33. Fell, Dafydd (2011). Polarization of party competition in the DPP era. In: R. Ash and P. Prime (eds.) Taiwan’s Democracy and Future: Economic and Political Challenges. London: Routledge.
  34. Fell, Dafydd (2006). Change and continuity in Taiwanese party politics since 2000. In: Dafydd Fell, Bi-yuChang and Henning Klöter(eds.) What has Changed? Taiwan Before and After the Change in Ruling Parties. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 21–40.
  35. Fell, Dafydd (2005). Success and failure of new parties in Taiwanese elections. China: An International Journal 3(2): 212–239.
  36. Fell, Dafydd (2004). Inter-party competition in Taiwan since the 1990s. China Perspectives 56.
  37. Fell, Dafydd and Chang, Biyu (eds) (2004). China Perspectives No.56 (November–December). This special issue on the theme "Taiwan: New Governments, Old Themes, or the Persistence of Continuity", is a partial result of the launching EATS conference in 2004.
  38. Fell, Dafydd; Chang, Bi-yu; and Klöter, Henning (eds.)(2006). What has Changed? Taiwan Before and After the Change in Ruling Parties. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz (StudiaFormosiana series). This edited volume is a collective effort of three founding members of EATS and a collective achievement of many EATS conference participants.
  39. Fell, Dafydd and Chen, Charles (2014). Lessons of defeat and success: Taiwan's 2012 elections in comparative perspective. The Journal of Current Chinese Affairs 43(3): 13–43.
  40. Fell, Dafydd; Sullivan, Jonathan and Sapir, Eliyahu (2013). Party candidate selection before and after the change of ruling parties: A study of the 2005 and 2009 local executive elections in Taiwan. Taiwan Journal of Democracy 9(2): 55–77.
  41. Göbel,Christian (2004). Beheading the hydra: Combating political corruption and organised crime. China Perspectives 56.
  42. Grano, Simona A. (2014). Change and continuities: Taiwan‘s post-2008 environmental policies. The Journal of Current Chinese Affairs 43(3): 129–159.
  43. Harrison, Mark (2007). Where is Taiwanese identity? In: C. Storm and M. Harrison (eds.) The Margins of Becoming. Identity and Culture in Taiwan. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 241–254.
  44. Heylen, Ann (2013). Reading history and political illustration in Taiwan popular culture. Oriental Archive 81(3): 411–435.
  45. Heylen, Ann (2012). Taiwan's historical relations with Europe: Perspectives on the past and the present. In: J. Damm and P. Lim (eds.) European Perspectives on Taiwan. Ostasien: VS Verlag, 25–43.
  46. Heylen, Ann (2007). Loading the matrix: Taiwanese in historical perspective. In: C. Storm and M. Harrison (eds.) The Margins of Becoming. Identity and Culture in Taiwan. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 39–54.
  47. Heylen, Ann and Dluhošová, Táňa (2013). Introduction to the special issue on ―Taiwan Studies: Popular Culture and Literature‖,Oriental Archive 81(3): 385–389.
  48. Heylen, Ann and Sommers, Scott (eds.)(2010). Becoming Taiwan: From Colonialism to Democracy. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz (StudiaFormosiana series). This edited volume represents a collective achievement of many EATS conference participants.
  49. Hickey, Dennis (2014). Taiwan and the rising tensions in the East China Sea: A mouse that roared. Asian Survey 54(3): 492–514.
  50. Homola, Stephanie (2013). Pursue good fortune and avoid calamity: The practice and status of divination in contemporary Taiwan. Journal of Chinese Religions 41(2): 124–147.
  51. Hsu, Minna (2010). Forming a basis of recognition: The construction of a Taiwanese Hakka identity through government policy since 2000. Taiwan International Studies Quarterly 6(2): 165–193.
  52. Huang, Wenchuan (2011). Street-naming and the subjectivity of Taiwan: A case study of Taipei City. Asian and African Studies 15(2): 47–58.
  53. Istenič, Saša(ed.)(2011).Asian and African Studies - Special Edition on Taiwan 15(2).The selected papers published in this special edition were originally presented at EATS Conference 2011, which for the first time brought to Ljubljana over 70 participants from different countries to debate over issues that specifically concern Taiwan.
  54. Istenič, Saša (2011). Opportunities, obstacles and challenges for China and Taiwan in adopting CBMs in the military/security domain. The Chinese (Taiwan) Yearbook of International Law and Affairs 27: 1–41.
  55. Johansson, Perry (2007). Psychoanalysis, film and the 'other' of Taiwanese nationalism. In: C. Storm and M. Harrison (eds.) The Margins of Becoming. Identity and Culture in Taiwan. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 141–152.
  56. Kaemmer, Christine (2007). Continuity and change of values: An analysis of literary textbooks of Taiwanese junior high schools. In: C. Storm and M. Harrison (eds.) The Margins of Becoming. Identity and Culture in Taiwan. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 69–82.
  57. Kleeman, Faye Yuan (2013). Body, identity, and social order: Japanese crime fiction in colonial Taiwan. Oriental Archive 81(3): 581–601.
  58. Klöter, Henning (2006). Mandarin remains more equal: Changes and continuities in Taiwan's language policy. In: Dafydd Fell, Bi-yuChang and Henning Klöter(eds.) What has Changed? Taiwan Before and After the Change in Ruling Parties. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 207–224.
  59. Klöter, Henning (2004). Language policy in the KMT and DPP eras. China Perspectives 56.
  60. Lams, Lutgard (2006). Shifting roles of GIO in Taiwanese international propaganda affairs and domestic media control. In: Dafydd Fell, Bi-yuChang and Henning Klöter(eds.) What has Changed? Taiwan Before and After the Change in Ruling Parties. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 243–264.
  61. Lan, Mike (2010). L‘Étranger across the Taiwan Strait: History of the civil war Taiwanese Kuomintang soldiers. In: Ann Heylen and Scott Sommers (eds.) Becoming Taiwan: From Colonialism to Democracy. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 135–148.
  62. Lee, Chao-ying (2011). Taiwan's appearance in the 18th century travelogue: Taking the text of histoire générale des voyages. Asian and African Studies 15(2): 1–20.
  63. Lee, Chun-Yi (2014). Learning a lesson from Taiwan? A comparison of changes and continuity of labour policies in Taiwan and China. The Journal of Current Chinese Affairs 43(3): 45–70.
  64. Lee, Pei-Ling (2013). All about 1895: An ideological analysis of TV serials from the two sides of the Taiwan Strait. Oriental Archive 81(3): 495–514.
  65. Lee, Wei-i (2007). The construction of community imaginaries in Taiwan‘s museums and archives committees (1945–1978). In: C. Storm and M. Harrison (eds.) The Margins of Becoming. Identity and Culture in Taiwan. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 173–184.
  66. Leou, Chia-feng (2006). Financial reform under the KMT and the DPP (1996–2004): Has the DPP government done a better job? In:Dafydd Fell, Bi-yu Chang and Henning Klöter (eds.) What has Changed? Taiwan Before and After the Change in Ruling Parties. Weisbaden: Harrassowitz, 107–125.
  67. Liao, Wen-shuo (2010). Empire and regional identity. ArchívOrientální/Oriental Archive 78(3): 243– 258.
  68. Lin, Ann Mei-fang et al (2011). Digital anthropology and the renewal of waishengren studies: From digitized tombs to identity. Asian and African Studies 15(2): 21–45.
  69. Lin, Fang-Mei (2010). The marginal, the paragovernmental, and the parasites: Revisiting the dualist debate of rights to sex work in Taipei. In: Ann Heylen and Scott Sommers (eds.) Becoming Taiwan: From Colonialism to Democracy. Wiesbaden, Harrassowitz, 101–116.
  70. Lin, Melissa S. H. (2010). Sakizaya or amis?-A hidden ethnic group in Taiwan? Asian Culture and History 2(1): 116–125.
  71. Lin, Pei-yin (2013). Gendering cross-strait relations: Romance and geopolitics in Li Ang'sSeven-Generation Predestined Relationship and Ping Lu's East and Beyond. Oriental Archive 81(3): 515–538.
  72. Lin, Pei-yin (2010). Remaking "Taiwan": Literary representations of the 2/28 Incident by Lin Yaode and Li Qiao. In: Ann Heylen and Scott Sommers (eds.) Becoming Taiwan: From Colonialism to Democracy. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 63–82.
  73. Mattlin, Mikael (2006). Policy laced with strategy: Cross-strait relations during the DPP administration. In: Dafydd Fell, Bi-yuChang and Henning Klöter(eds.) What has Changed? Taiwan Before and After the Change in Ruling Parties. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 41–60.
  74. Mattlin, Mikael (2004). Same content, different wrapping: Cross-strait policy under DPP rule. China Perspectives 56.
  75. Momesso, Lara (2016). From someone, to no-one, to a new-one: A subjective view of Taiwan's immigration policies in the context of multiculturalism. Chinese History and Society/Berliner China-Hefte47.
  76. Momesso, Lara (2012). Between official and concealed: Reconsidering the status of mainland spouses in contemporary Taiwan. In: Astrid Lipinsky (ed.) Immigration Societies – Taiwan and Beyond. Berlin:LIT.
  77. Mon, Ya-Feng (2015). Terms of intimacy: Blog marketing, experiential desegregation and collaborative film value production. In: Virginia Crisp and Gabriel Menotti (eds.) Besides the Screen: Moving Images through Distribution, Promotion and Curation. London: Palgrave Macmillan.
  78. Mon, Ya-Feng (2011). The Audience Starts to Think, Yet the Industry Can’t Laugh (Monograph).
  79. Neri, Corrado (2015). Haunted island: Reflections on the Japanese colonial era in Taiwanese cinema. In: W. Morris (ed.) Japanese Taiwan: Colonial Rule and its contested Legacy. London: Bloomsbury.
  80. Neri, Corrado (2015/2017). Quand Taiwan voudrait ne pas êtreuneîle. In: StéphaneCorcuff and JérômeSoldani (eds.) Taiwan est-elleuneîle? (à paraître).
  81. Ohlendorf, Hardina (2014). The Taiwan dilemma in Chinese nationalism: Taiwan studies in the People's Republic of China. Asian Survey 54(3): 471–491.
  82. Ota, Satoshi (2007). Because they look real. Watching Japanese TV dramas among Taiwanese youth. In: C. Storm and M. Harrison (eds.) The Margins of Becoming. Identity and Culture in Taiwan. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 125–141.
  83. Passi, Federica (2014). The role and importance of indigenous peoples in the 'creation' of Taiwanese literature. In: Mario Sabattini (ed.) I libri e illiuto. Venezia: Edizioni Ca' Foscari, 633–644.
  84. Passi, Frederica (2010). Irony, satire and the spirit of resistance: Anew reading of three Taiwanese short stories from the period of the Japanese occupation. ArchivOrientální/Oriental Archive 78(3): 259–278.
  85. Payne, Christopher (2013). Queer otherwise: Anti-sociality in Wuhe'sGui'er and Ayao. ArchivOrientalni/Oriental Archive 81(3): 539–554.
  86. Platzerova, Barbora(2016). Bigamy in Chinese law in the 20th century: Conflict between laws and special cases of bigamy. Chinese History and Society/Berliner China-Hefte47.
  87. Rawnsley, Gary D. (2014). Taiwan's soft power and public diplomacy. The Journal of Current Chinese Affairs 43(3): 161–174.
  88. Rawnsley, Gary D. and Rawnsley, Ming-yeh T. (2006). The media in Taiwan: Change and continuity. In: Dafydd Fell, Bi-yuChang and Henning Klöter(eds.) What has Changed? Taiwan Before and After the Change in Ruling Parties. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 225–242.
  89. Rawnsley, Gary D. and Rawnsley, Ming-yeh T. (2004). Media reform 1987. China Perspectives 56.
  90. Rawnsley, Ming-yeh T. (ed.)(2014). Topical issue of the Journal of Current Chinese Affairs on "Continuity and Change in Policies in Taiwan", Vol.43, No.3. The inspiration for this topical issue came from two major international conferences in 2012: the EATS annual conference in Sonderborg, Denmark and the first World Congress of Taiwan Studies in Academia Sinica in Taipei. The topical issue addresses the central question of whether and how the shift of power between political parties in democracies matters.
  91. Rawnsley, Ming-yeh T. (2014). The impacts of changing ruling parties in the twenty-first century The Journal of Current Chinese Affairs 43(3): 3–12.
  92. Rawnsley, Ming-yeh T. (2013). Taiwanese-language cinema: Market vs. state, national vs. transnational. Oriental Archive 81(3): 437–458.
  93. Rawnsley, Ming-yeh T. and Feng, Chien-san (2014). Anti–media-monopoly policies and further democratisation in Taiwan. The Journal of Current Chinese Affairs 43(3): 105–128.
  94. Sejrup, Jens (2016). One or the other: Synecdoche and representation in Taiwan-Japan controversies. Chinese History and Society/Berliner China-Hefte47.
  95. Sejrup, Jens (2015). Reliving the past: The narrative themes of repetition and continuity in Japan-Taiwan news coverage. In: Andrew Morris (ed.) Japanese Taiwan: Colonial Rule and its contested Legacy. London: Bloomsbury Academic, 271–296.
  96. Sejrup, Jens (2014). Awakening the sufferers: Reflections on public relations, activism, and subalternity in postcolonial controversies between Taiwan and Japan. Public Relations Inquiry3(1): 51–68.
  97. Sejrup, Jens (2012). Instrumentalized history and the motif of repetition in news coverage of Japan-Taiwan relations. Pacific Affairs 85(4): 745–765.
  98. Sheng, Kai (2013). The different faces of Nezha in modern Taiwanese culture. ArchivOrientalni/Oriental Archive 81(3): 391–410.
  99. Shih, Fang-long (2006). From regulation and rationalization, to production: Government policy on religion in Taiwan. In: Dafydd Fell, Bi-yuChang and Henning Klöter(eds.) What has Changed? Taiwan Before and After the Change in Ruling Parties. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 265–284.
  100. Sia, Ek-hongLjavakaw(2016). Crafting the Taiwanese nation: Exclusivist and inclusivisttheses of the post-war Taiwanese nationalism. Chinese History and Society/Berliner China-Hefte47.
  101. Simon, Scott (2012). Politics and headhunting among the Formosan Sejiq.EthnohistoricalPerpectives: Oceania 82(2): 164–185.
  102. Simon, Scott (2009). Identitéautochtone et lutte pour l‘autodétermination: Le cas de la nation taroko à Formose. In: Thibault Martin (ed.) Autochtonies. Vues de France et du Québec. Québec: Presses de l‘université de Laval, 311–330.
  103. Simon, Scott (2007). Paths to autonomy: Aboriginality and the nation in Taiwan. In: Carsten Storm and Mark Harrison (eds.) The Margins of Becoming. Identity and Culture in Taiwan. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 221–240.
  104. Simon, Scott (2006). Taiwan's indigenized constitution: What place for Aboriginal Formosa. Taiwan International Studies Quarterly 2(1): 251–270.
  105. Soldani, Jérôme (2011). Contested representations of Taiwanese baseball: Political interpretations and moral values of a national sport. Asian and African Studies 15(2): 59–75.
  106. Stepanova, Elena Nickolaevna (2013). Search for Chinese woman: DPP and the peculiarities of fight for women electorate. Mir and Politika Journal 77(2): 128–141.
  107. Stepanova, Elena Nickolaevna (2013). Some aspects of concept realization «one state-two systems» concerning Taiwan. Mir and Politika. February.
  108. Stepanova, Elena Nickolaevna (2011). Women and power in Taiwan. Scientific and social-political Journal of the Russian Academy of Sciences 2: 128–136.
  109. Sterk, Darryl (2013). The hunter's gift in ecorealistindigenous fiction from Taiwan. Oriental Archive 81(3): 555–580.
  110. Storm, Carsten (2007). Historicity and identity in Li Qiao‘s Wintry Nights. In: C. Storm and M. Harrison (eds.) The Margins of Becoming. Identity and Culture in Taiwan. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 101– 116.
  111. Storm, Carsten and Harrison, Mark (eds.) (2007). The Margins of Becoming. Identity and Culture in Taiwan. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz (StudiaFormosiana series). This volume represents a collective achievement of many EATS conference participants.
  112. Streiter, Oliver and Goudin, Yoann (2013). The Tanghao on Taiwan‘s tombstones: The statalrecuperation of tactics for the creation of a national space. Oriental Archive 81(3): 459–494.
  113. Sullivan, J. (2010). Legislators' blogs in Taiwan. Parliamentary Affairs 63(3): 471–485.
  114. Sullivan, J. (2008). Campaign advertising and democracy in Taiwan. The China Quarterly 196: 900– 911.
  115. Sullivan, J. and Sapir, E. (2013). Strategic cross-strait discourse: Comparing three presidential terms. China Information 27(1): 11–30.
  116. Sullivan, J. and Sapir, E. (2012) Nasty or nice? Explaining positive and negative campaigning in Taiwan. The China Journal 67: 149–168.
  117. Taylor, J.E. (2009). The reluctant embassy: Establishing, maintaining and ending Australian diplomatic representation in Taipei, 1966–72. Asian Studies Review 33(2): 197–210.
  118. Tischer, Jacob F. (2014). Mazusneue Heimat. Interpretationen und InstitutioneneinerchinesischenGöttin in Taiwan. Regiospectra.
  119. Travagnin, Stefania (2007). Master Yinshun and Buddhist nuns in/for the human realm: Shift and continuity from theory to practice of renjianfojiao in contemporary Taiwan. In: C. Storm and M. Harrison (eds.) The Margins of Becoming. Identity and Culture in Taiwan. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 83–100.
  120. Tsai, Caroline (2010). Engineering the social or engaging "everyday modernity"? Interwar Taiwan reconsidered. In: Ann Heylen and Scott Sommers (eds.) Becoming Taiwan: From Colonialism to Democracy. (studia formosiana). Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 83–100.
  121. Tsai, Henry Shih-shan (2015). Rising World Socialism and the Taiwanese Peasant Movement, 1925-1934. Island and Empire. Taipei: Academia Sinica.
  122. Tzeng, Shih-rong (2007). Identity and war: The Taiwanese national consciousness under war mobilization and kominka movement – a study of Chen Wangcheng's and Wu Xinrong'sdiaries (1937– 1945). In: C. Storm, Carsten and M. Harrison (eds.) The Margins of Becoming. Identity and Culture in Taiwan. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 153–172.
  123. Weng, Hui-chen and Fell, Dafydd (2006). Taiwan's women's movement in the KMT and DPP eras. In: Dafydd Fell, Bi-yuChang and Henning Klöter(eds.) What has Changed? Taiwan Before and After the Change in Ruling Parties. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 147–164.
  124. Wu, Chien-hui (2009). What Peace? Whose Security? A Critical Assessment of Taiwan-China Direct (Monograph).
  125. Wu, Naiteh (2016). Political competition framed by the China factor? Looking beyond the 2012 presidential election. In: Gunter Schubert (ed.) Taiwan and The ‘China Impact’: Challenges and Opportunities. London: Routledge, 130–148.
  126. Wu, Naiteh and Cheng, Tun-jen (2011). Democratization as a legitimacy formula: The KMT and political change in Taiwan. In: J. Kane et al (eds.) Political Legitimacy in Asia: New Leadership Challenges. New York: Palgrave, 59–87.

Benjamin Hlavaty received a Master’s in Taiwan Studies from SOAS, University of London in 2007 and is currently a freelance researcher in Taiwan.